KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

CHRISTINA SALMIVALLI, PhD, is a Professor of psychology at the University of Turku, Finland. She has done research on bullying and its evidence-based prevention for > 25 years. Professor Salmivalli led the development of the KiVa antibullying program (www.kivaprogram.net), which has been awarded both nationally and internationally, and is widely implemented in schools in Finland and beyond. Salmivalli has published extensively on the topics of children’s peer relations and school bullying. Her current research interests include the effectiveness of different approaches to tackle bullying, the sustainability of the implementation and effects of prevention programs, and the mechanisms of program effects.

Bullying through the lenses of morality and peer group dynamics

Shelley Hymel and Christina Salmivalli

In their presentation, Hymel and Salmivalli present and discuss theoretical approaches and empirical findings on the driving forces behind bullying, focusing on moral emotions and cognitions within the individual (including moral disengagement) on one hand, and on the peer contextual factors that support or diminish the likelihood of bullying on the other.   Of interest is how both influence the prevalence of bullying as well as the adjustment of the victimized students, and how both need to be addressed in prevention and intervention work. They also address what has come to be known as the “healthy context paradox”, which refers to the phenomenon that victimized students in social contexts in which the overall level of bullying goes down seem to be especially maladjusted – and the implications this has for educational practice.

SHELLEY HYMEL holds the Edith Lando Professorship in Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) in the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia. She promotes SEL through a specialized Masters program and through Teacher Education and  created a unique online resource for educators, the SEL Resource Finder (www.selrecources.com). She is co-founder of the Bullying Research Network (http://brnet.unl.edu/), linking nearly 200 researchers from countries around the world. She is part of the executive team of PREVNet (www.prevnet.ca), Canada’s national organization for “Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence,” She publishes extensively on social development, peer relations, and has worked directly with students experiencing social difficulties and with school districts that want to address the social side of education.

Bullying through the lenses of morality and peer group dynamics

Shelley Hymel and Christina Salmivalli

In their presentation, Hymel and Salmivalli present and discuss theoretical approaches and empirical findings on the driving forces behind bullying, focusing on moral emotions and cognitions within the individual (including moral disengagement) on one hand, and on the peer contextual factors that support or diminish the likelihood of bullying on the other.   Of interest is how both influence the prevalence of bullying as well as the adjustment of the victimized students, and how both need to be addressed in prevention and intervention work. They also address what has come to be known as the “healthy context paradox”, which refers to the phenomenon that victimized students in social contexts in which the overall level of bullying goes down seem to be especially maladjusted – and the implications this has for educational practice.

Dr. PETER SMITH’s research interest is children’s social development, and he was Head of the Unit for School and Family Studies in the Department of Psychology at Goldsmith’s from 1998 to 2011. He received his B.Sc at the University of Oxford and his PhD from the University of Sheffield; following his doctorate he continued at the University of Sheffield, obtaining a Personal Chair in 1991, before moving to Goldsmiths College in 1995. Dr. Smith is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, the Association of Psychological Sciences, and the Academy of Social Sciences. His most extensive research has been on bullying and violence in schools, where he has led a number of research projects. He was the Chair of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology Cyberbullying Action (COST ACTION IS0801) from 2008-2012, and was PI of a project Bullying, Cyberbullying, and Pupil Safety and Wellbeing, financed by the Indian-European Research Networking in the Social sciences initiative (2012-2015). He is currently co-PI of a project Comparative study of cyberbullying in Qatar and the UK: risk factors, impact on health and solutions, financed by the Qatar National Research Fund (2013-2016). Publications include the edited collections (with Dr. Debra Pepler and Dr. Ken Rigby) Bullying in Schools: How Successful can Interventions be? (Cambridge University Press, 2004); (with Dr. Qing Li and Dr. Donna Cross) Cyberbullying in the Global Playground: Research from International Perspectives (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012); (with Dr. Georges Steffgen) Cyberbullying through the New media: Findings from an International Network (Psychology Press, 2013) and (with Dr. Keumjoo Kwak and Dr. Yuichi Toda) School Bullying in Different Cultures: Eastern and Western Perspectives (Cambridge University Press, 2016). He is also author of Understanding School Bullying: Its Nature and Prevention Strategies (Sage, 2014), and Adolescence: A Very Short Introduction (OUP, 2016). In 2015 he was awarded the William Thierry Preyer award for Excellence in Research on Human Development, by the European Society for Developmental Psychology.

Charlotte Petri Gornitzka took up her role as Assistant Secretary-General and UNICEF Deputy Executive Director, Partnerships, on 15 October 2018. Ms Petri Gornitzka, who served as the Chair of the Development Assistance Committee at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development prior to her appointment brings to the position 20 years of experience in international development. She has successfully built innovative partnerships with leaders from civil society, national Governments and the private sector to deliver programme results and influence critical policy changes.
Before joining OECD, Ms Petri Gornitzka served as Director General of the Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency (2010–2016), where she established a network of Swedish and Sweden-based companies to promote sustainable global development. She was previously Secretary-General of the International Save the Children Alliance (2008–2010) and Save the Children Sweden (2003–2008), following six years as Under-Secretary-General and Director of Communications at the Swedish Red Cross (1998–2003).

DORTE MARIE SØNDERGAARD, D.phil., Professor in social psychology at the School of Education, Aarhus University, and director of the research program (Dis)Engaging Children and Young People. She headed the interdisciplinary research team eXbus: Exploring Bullying in School which conceptualized bullying as an effect of heterogeneously combining social, discursive, digital and subjective forces in children’s and young people’s everyday lives. Søndergaard has co-edited School Bullying: New Theories in Context (Cambridge University Press), and published a range of articles on bullying, e.g. ‘Bullying and social exclusion anxiety in schools’; ‘The thrill of bullying’; ‘New materialist analyses of virtual gaming, distributed violence and relational aggression’; and ‘The Dilemmas of Victim Positioning’.

Bullying in Schools and Online: Research Approaches from

Europe and Africa

Prof. Dorte Marie Sondergaard and Prof. Michael Kyobe

Bullying affects the quality of education and the possibility of social and subjective becoming for all children and young people. A range of different forces and factors are involved in the emergence of bullying practices both at school and online. Research approaches vary from e.g. mapping bullying behaviour in categories and numbers to theorizing the cultural and socio-material mechanisms involved. In this keynote, we bring in two different research approaches and present bullying research from two different geopolitical zones. We aim to create better understanding of these approaches, their potential combination, and their transformative perspectives.

MICHAEL KYOBE, PhD is a Professor of Information Systems and Deputy Dean for research & Internationalization in the Commerce faculty at the University of Cape Town. Michael is a rated researcher by the South Africa National Research Foundation (NRF) and his research focuses on mobile bullying, security, ICT Legislation, alignment and governance. He is the Principal Investigator for the mobile bullying project funded by the South African National Research Foundation.

Bullying in Schools and Online: Research Approaches from

Europe and Africa

Prof. Dorte Marie Sondergaard and Prof. Michael Kyobe

Bullying affects the quality of education and the possibility of social and subjective becoming for all children and young people. A range of different forces and factors are involved in the emergence of bullying practices both at school and online. Research approaches vary from e.g. mapping bullying behaviour in categories and numbers to theorizing the cultural and socio-material mechanisms involved. In this keynote, we bring in two different research approaches and present bullying research from two different geopolitical zones. We aim to create better understanding of these approaches, their potential combination, and their transformative perspectives.

RENÉ VEENSTRA, Professor of Sociology, University of Groningen, the Netherlands. He is the director of the Interuniversity Center for Social Science Theory and Methodology (ICS). He was a Visiting Professor at the Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland for the period 2007-2011 and Associate Editor of the Journal of Research on Adolescence for the period 2010-2016. He coordinated the implementation and evaluation of the KiVa Antibullying Program in the Netherlands. In 2015 he was awarded a prestigious VICI grant (EUR 1.5 million). He published on a variety of topics, including bullying and victimization, peer relations, and social network analysis. His website: www.rene-veenstra.nl

Social networks and social and moral competence: a new

challenge in bullying prevention

Dr. Eva Romera and Dr. René Veenstra

Studies on bullying have underlined the importance of psychological and peer group characteristics in understanding this phenomenon. Paying attention to the interactive dynamics between individual and group characteristics through longitudinal studies becomes a point of current scientific interest. This joint keynote focuses on empirical research on the motivational, moral and emotional competence of school children, and the role of social networks and norms. The construction of a holistic model that puts its focus of interest on bullying as an immoral phenomenon will be deepened. Likewise, the results presented will shed light on the so-called Healthy Group Paradox. The educational implications of the lines of research presented will be analyzed and future directions for anti-bullying programs will be proposed.

PhD. EVA ROMERA is Associate Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of Córdoba (Spain). She is Director of the Master in Applied Psychology in Education and Social Well-being and member of the International Observatory of School Violence. She has been involved in the analysis of psychosocial risk factors associated with the involvement in school violence and peer victimization. She has also experience in working in training programmes in schools. She currently holds Principal Investigator position in a nation-wide study on longitudinal analysis of social and emotional traits related to bullying and cyberbullying and PI of an European project (H2020) about development of social competence in children to promote well-being and mental health.

Social networks and social and moral competence: a new

challenge in bullying prevention

Dr. Eva Romera and Dr. René Veenstra

Studies on bullying have underlined the importance of psychological and peer group characteristics in understanding this phenomenon. Paying attention to the interactive dynamics between individual and group characteristics through longitudinal studies becomes a point of current scientific interest. This joint keynote focuses on empirical research on the motivational, moral and emotional competence of school children, and the role of social networks and norms. The construction of a holistic model that puts its focus of interest on bullying as an immoral phenomenon will be deepened. Likewise, the results presented will shed light on the so-called Healthy Group Paradox. The educational implications of the lines of research presented will be analyzed and future directions for anti-bullying programs will be proposed.

Antigone Davis is a Director and Global Head of Safety at Facebook.

As Facebook’s Global Head of Safety, Antigone works with internal teams, external safety organizations, and government bodies to ensure that Facebook is a world leader in online safety.

Antigone spearheads the efforts of Facebook’s Safety Advisory Board, a team of leading safety organizations from across the globe that provide Facebook with cutting edge research and advice on best practices, as well as its Global Safety Network.

Antigone also serves on the International Advisory Board for WePROTECT and the boards of the Family Online Safety Institute, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and the National Network to End Domestic Violence.

Prior to joining Facebook, Antigone spent 10 years working for a State Attorney General. As Senior Advisor to the Attorney General, she helped establish the office’s first online privacy and safety unit. She also led the National Association of Attorneys General’s 2012-2013 presidential initiative “Privacy in the Digital Age.”

Before serving in the public sector, Antigone used her juris doctorate from the University of Chicago Law School as a corporate attorney and her masters in education as a middle school and high school teacher. Antigone received her B.A. from Columbia University.

CHRISTIAN BERGER, PhD, is an Associate professor at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, where he serves as the Associate Chair for Research and Graduate Studies at the School of Psychology. His research aims at understanding peer relations, in particular how social status and aggressive and prosocial behaviors are part of the adolescent peer culture. He also focuses on how contexts affect the development of positive or negative interpersonal relationships. He has published several studies addressing the effects of peer norms on aggression and bullying and also using Social Network Analysis to understand how positive and negative peer interactions unfold. 

More broadly, he studies peer ecologies and school environments, and protective factors to prevent school violence and to promote a nurturing school social climate.

Psychological assets for preventing and counteracting bullying

Prof. Christian Berger and Prof. Susan Swearer

Ecological approaches to bullying have identified factors at different levels of the social hierarchy. In this keynote, we will address specific factors at the individual level that have been shown to prevent the emergence of bullying, and counteract its negative consequences. In particular, the inclusion of the socioemotional-learning framework as a guiding principle for school interventions against bullying has highlighted the role of socio-emotional skills and psychological resources.

The role of these skills and resources will be discussed as assets for victims, bullies and bystanders. In order to do so, key factors of bullying from will be highlighted, discussing the definition of bullying and focusing on the individual experiences related to the bonds with their peers, the ability to understand and connect to others, and the development of psychological safety.

SUSAN SWEARER, PhD, is the Willa Cather Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln and a licensed psychologist. She co-founded and co-directs the Bullying Research Network (http://cehs.unl.edu/brnet), directs the Nebraska Bullying Prevention and Intervention Initiative (http://cehs.unl.edu/empowerment), and is coauthor/co-editor of the books: Bullying Prevention and Intervention: Realistic Strategies for Schools, Handbook of Bullying in Schools and Bullying in North American Schools. Dr Swearer has authored over 100 chapters and articles on bullying prevention and intervention, depression, and anxiety among youth and young people. She was the chair of the Research Advisory Board for Lady Gaga’s Born This Way Foundation (www.bornthisway.foundation) from 2012-2016 and was an invited presenter at the White House Bullying Prevention conference in 2011 under President and First Lady Obama.

Psychological assets for preventing and counteracting bullying

Prof. Christian Berger and Prof. Susan Swearer

Ecological approaches to bullying have identified factors at different levels of the social hierarchy. In this keynote, we will address specific factors at the individual level that have been shown to prevent the emergence of bullying, and counteract its negative consequences. In particular, the inclusion of the socioemotional-learning framework as a guiding principle for school interventions against bullying has highlighted the role of socio-emotional skills and psychological resources.

The role of these skills and resources will be discussed as assets for victims, bullies and bystanders. In order to do so, key factors of bullying from will be highlighted, discussing the definition of bullying and focusing on the individual experiences related to the bonds with their peers, the ability to understand and connect to others, and the development of psychological safety.

Anna Maria Corazza Bildt is the European Parliament Coordinator for children’s rights. She is the spokesperson for the entire European Parliament, ensuring the promotion, respect and safeguarding of children´s rights in all European Parliament policies and legislation and that the best interests of children are always fully respected in EU legislation and non-legislative initiatives of the Parliament.She is a Member of the European Parliament, elected in Sweden, and the former co-chair and founder of the EP Intergroup on Children´s Rights. 

KEVIN KUMASHIRO, PhD, is an internationally recognized expert on educational policy, school reform, teacher preparation, and educational equity and social justice, with a wide-ranging list of accomplishments and awards as a scholar, educator, leader, and advocate. He is the former Dean of the School of Education at the University of San Francisco, and is the award-winning author or editor of ten books, including Against Common Sense: Teaching and Learning toward Social Justice, and Bad Teacher!: How Blaming Teachers Distorts the Bigger Picture. His recent awards include the 2016 Social Justice in Education Award from the American Educational Research Association, and an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters.  Website

Connecting the Dots: Insights from Sociology and Cross-

Cultural Perspectives

Prof. Kevin Kumashiro and Prof. Shoko Yoneyama

This keynote paper looks beyond the characteristics and circumstances of individual students to understand bullying. School, society and culture are important factors, and insights from sociology of education and social-justice education will be used to present ‘broad-brush’ structural perspectives to increase understanding of the issue. Particular references are made to the socio-cultural contexts of Japan and the U.S. The distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 bullying will be introduced.

SHOKO YONEYAMA, PhD, is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Social Sciences, University of Adelaide. She has worked extensively in the fields of sociology of education and Japanese Studies and is recognised internationally as the author of The Japanese High School: Silence and Resistance (Routledge, London 1999, pp.287) which features a key chapter on bullying (‘Ijime: The price of super-conformity’). Focussing on youth issues such as bullying and school non-attendance, which are complex and also often framed in particular ways in mainstream discourse, Dr Yoneyama’s research explores the role of large-scale structural factors from a sociological perspective (e.g. neoliberalism, the school and education system in different cultural contexts including Japan and Australia), as well as attending to the perspectives and experiences of the young people themselves, which allow alternative understandings and possibilities to emerge.  Further publications on bullying include ‘Problems with the Paradigm: The school as a factor in understanding bullying’, British Journal of Sociology of Education (2003 with Asao Naito); and ‘Theorizing school bullying: Insights from Japan’ in Swedish journal Confero (2015).  Her most recent work includes the book Animism in Contemporary Japan: Voices for the Anthropocene from Post-Fukushima Japan (Routledge, London 2019, pp.250) addressing human-nature relationships and spirituality as key questions in the age of the Anthropocene. For more details of her research see: Shoko Yoneyama Researcher Profile.

Connecting the Dots: Insights from Sociology and Cross-

Cultural Perspectives

Prof. Kevin Kumashiro and Prof. Shoko Yoneyama

This keynote paper looks beyond the characteristics and circumstances of individual students to understand bullying. School, society and culture are important factors, and insights from sociology of education and social-justice education will be used to present ‘broad-brush’ structural perspectives to increase understanding of the issue. Particular references are made to the socio-cultural contexts of Japan and the U.S. The distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 bullying will be introduced.

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